Click to read the latest from the Deadmarsh Family!
*~ The latest photo of the Deadmarsh family dated June 18, 2008 ~*
(Photo courtesy Christa Deadmarsh through denverpost.com)

Proud daddy Adam with newborn twin daughters Alexis and Madison in 2001.

My, how they've grown...
The twins (with Adam and Christa) on March 20, 2006 at their dad's formal retirement ceremony at STAPLES Center.
(Unfortunately, I can't tell who's who...lol)

From the Kings' Wives' Cookbook, courtesy of Rosalyn:

Adam and Christa started dating at the age of 15 and they were married July 17, 1999 in their hometown of Trail, British Columbia, Canada. They
recently welcomed the birth of their twin daughters on February 9, 2001, Alexis and Madison.

Adam, Christa, and their new girls will spend the off season back in
British Columbia where they enjoy spending time with their family and

friends. The Deadmarsh family looks forward to making their new home in
Los Angeles.

One year later.....

Alexis and Madison pose with the Emerson boys.
Picture from the LA Kings 2001-2002 yearbook, courtesy of Rosalyn!
All together now for the babies......AWWWWWW!! :) :)


Alexis and Madison with both Adam and Christa, from a phone book of some kind that Christa had a sufficient part in the creation of in that it featured each player and his family in photos like the one above. Says Christa about Adam and their daughters:

"I love watching Alexis and Madison play with Adam. It is adorable when they both crawl over to him screaming 'da da.' Within seconds, Adam becomes the household jungle gym! It is truly amazing how two little people can brighten up your day!"


Photo from the 2002-03 Kings yearbook: Adam holding Alexis,
and Christa holding Madison from the "My Family" page.. :)


Adam with the girls in a photo submitted by Rosalyn from a
Kings program at the end of the season.


From plbsports.com.

The top 10 baby names for 2001:

1-Emily
2-Hannah
3-Madison
4-Samantha
5-Ashley
6-Sarah
7-Elizabeth
8-Kayla
9-Alexis
10-Abigail

as named by Parenting.com,
based on a 1% sample of Social Security card applications
for births from January through August 2001.

I have a few articles from around the 'net about the twins' story, so I thought that since it really isn't exactly the latest news, all these news stories should have a page of their own.

Enjoy!!

Sunday, January 21, 2001

The story of Adam and Ed:
Deadmarsh, Jovanovski trade life experiences along with fisticuffs


By DICK CHUBEY -- Edmonton Sun

Ed Jovanovski and Adam Deadmarsh are far from the best of pals. Anything but.

Not only do they perform for fierce divisional rivals, but Jovanovski and Deadmarsh have clashed in a couple of spirited scraps this season - one on Nov. 1 which KOed the Colorado winger for five weeks with a concussion.

But the pair have been drawn together by a personal off-ice matter.

Jovanovski's wife, Kirstin, was pregnant with twin daughters and lost one to a premature death earlier in January. The other twin is okay and due in April.

"I heard about what happened (to the Jovanovskis) and I wouldn't wish that on anybody,'' said Deadmarsh, whose wife, Christa, is expecting twins within the next couple of weeks and has also gone into premature labour.

"I definitely know what he's going through,'' said Jovanovski, a rugged Vancouver defenceman. "I hope everything turns out okay for them.''

The pair chatted during the warmup prior to Thursday's 7-3 Colorado triumph. They did not fight during the game, but Deadmarsh sustained a knee injury on a low hit from Todd Bertuzzi.

Deadmarsh glared menacingly at the Canucks winger, but is only expected to miss a couple of games.


Article courtesy allpop.com

Twins!
Colorado Avalanche winger Adam Deadmarsh Welcomes Pair of Future Skaters.


By Kimberly Snow
02/13/01

After playing one period of hockey on Friday night, Colorado Avalanche winger Adam Deadmarsh rushed to Rose Medical Center to witness the birth of his twin daughters.

Madison and Alexis Deadmarsh were born during the third period of Colorados game against Calgary. Daddy Deadmarsh scored Colorados first goal and then rushed during the second period to his wifes side.

According to the Denver Post, Deadmarsh was released from the game after the timeout.

"We wished him luck, and he got out of here in world-record time," Avalanche coach Bob Hartley said.

The girls were born six-weeks before their due date of March 22. Krista Deadmarsh had been on prescribed bed rest after going into premature labor earlier in the pregnancy.

Being premature as well as twins, the girls are small but healthy. Madison weighs in at 4 pounds, 3 ounces, while Alexis is 4 pounds, 9 ounces.

This is not the first set of twins on the Avalanche this year. Chase and Kamryn Sakic were born October 14. The birth of the brother/sister pair sparked a scoring streak that has put Sakic in the lead of the points standings.


Article courtesy worldhockeynet.com


Deadmarsh brings twice the incentive

By Mark Kiszla
Denver Post Sports Columnist
Thursday, April 26, 2001

Of the 100 reasons why Los Angeles Kings right wing Adam Deadmarsh wants to beat his former team in the NHL playoffs, he holds two sources of inspiration closest to his heart.
Their names are Madison and Alexis. They are the babies who had to be tough merely to reach birth. They are Deadmarsh's twin daughters, born six weeks premature, only a dozen days before the Colorado Avalanche traded him to L.A. on Feb. 21.

Sometimes, even hockey players cry. Deadmarsh did, realizing he would have to say goodbye to his daughters with them in incubators at the intensive care unit of a Denver hospital. Although they're now growing healthier by the day, they remain oh-so-small, only 8 pounds each, not much more than a handful in a strong athlete's arms.

But every time Deadmarsh picks up those little girls and presses his lips against their sweet faces, they fill his soul as two of God's most amazing miracles.

"It has been a hard year. But my prayers have been answered," Deadmarsh said Wednesday. "The babies are both healthy. Everything else is trivial."

When daddy's gone, as Deadmarsh has been for all but 14 nights of his daughters' young lives, he carries the smiles of Alexis and Madison with him in a photograph, from which the little girls beam at him while wearing the team colors of the very Kings who took him away.

"We always figured Adam would be traded from Colorado one day," said Christa Deadmarsh, his wife. "It was just that the timing was bad."

How could it possibly have been worse? The Avalanche broke up Deadmarsh's family and sent him packing to a strange city, at the precise moment when his presence was needed most. Hockey can be a brutal business, and no matter how you cut it, the Avalanche's actions were as cold as ice.

Colorado general manager Pierre Lacroix, who often talks about the Avs as family, sat Deadmarsh down in his office and severed a relationship between the athlete and organization he had called home since Day One of his NHL career. Lacroix "had to treat it like a business decision, and he did," Deadmarsh said.

Before Deadmarsh could depart for the airport to begin a new life, however, he first had to make the hardest trip of a young father's life, going to the hospital where his wife anxiously was watching over the couple's daughters. He had covered the same route less than two weeks earlier, racing toward the maternity ward with a police escort, his suit clothes hanging on a sweaty body he hadn't dared bother to shower after being called away from a game, urging the cop to run every red light, hoping and praying everybody he loved most in the world would be OK.

So how did Deadmarsh break the news he was leaving those babies and moving 1,000 miles away from Christa against his will? With a bucket of tears.

"I was sitting in a chair, holding Madison," Christa Deadmarsh recalled, "when a nurse came in and said my mother was on the telephone. She was the one who actually told me about the trade. She had heard it on television back in Canada.

"I didn't want to believe her. I kind of freaked out. Then I started to cry. When Adam finally got to the hospital, he said goodbye to the babies and we went home to talk. I hyperventilated on the way home. That night was hard. But the more we talked, the more we found the positive things in the trade. ... Then, you kind of start going day by day, because you don't really have any choice."

Deadmarsh made the journey back to Colorado with the Kings this week, and slept in his own bed for just the fourth time since he was forced to leave Alexis and Madison more than two months ago. The second round of the Western Conference playoffs begin in the Pepsi Center, where tonight he will lace up his skates as a visitor. It will be strange sight for an arena full of people who still fondly call him "Deader." Christa will be in the building, celebrating a mom's first big night out since she willed those twins into the world after a difficult, bedridden pregnancy.

Deadmarsh is here to remind the Avalanche players why so many of them frowned on the night the team acquired all-star defenseman Rob Blake from the Kings. A teenage boy who grew up to be a 25-year-old man in Colorado is here to put a big hit on his best friend, Peter Forsberg, vowing with a chuckle, "I'd like to erase his face; I don't like looking at it anyway." Deadmarsh is here to show Lacroix what a mistake it was to trade him.

With Lacroix present in L.A. earlier this week, Deadmarsh destroyed Detroit's championship dreams with an overtime goal that clinched the league's biggest upset of the first round. Can he now be an Avs killer?

"I hope so," Deadmarsh said. "I don't look at it like I'm standing in their way. I look at it like they're standing in my way."

But of all the ways Deader is grateful and giddy to be back in Denver, the best reason for this trip has absolutely nothing to do with the roar of the crowd, or L.A.'s unlikely Stanley Cup quest, or anything pertaining to sports.

This is not a hockey story. It's a love story.

For Deadmarsh, know what the real thrill of returning to Colorado is?

Daddy's home.


Article courtesy denverpostonline.com


An Avalanche of newborns:
Seven have been born since August


By John Branch/The Gazette

DENVER - Adam Deadmarsh sat in front of his locker, sweat dripping from the shaggy hair that hangs over his eyes. He was exhausted. It was a good kind of exhausted.

"It's been the best couple of days of my life," the Avalanche winger said. And several of his teammates could understand.

When Deadmarsh's wife, Christa, gave birth to twins Madison and Alexis on Friday night, she became the fifth player's wife to deliver since August. Of the 10 married players on the Colorado roster, half of them have children six months old or younger. And with two sets of twins - the other to Joe Sakic and his wife, Debbie, in October - there are seven Avs babies crawling around.

"There's something in the water," Deadmarsh said.

Pregnancy isn't supposed to be contagious, but it has spread through the Avalanche locker room. Grace Heather Miller got things started in August. Then came Chase and Kamryn Sakic, Chloe de Vries and Nolan Foote.

"I guess you start seeing other guys with babies around and you start thinking about starting a family of your own," Deadmarsh said with shrug. "It's kind of like catching a fever."

The Deadmarsh girls arrived nearly six weeks before their due date, each weighing less than 5 pounds. But they are doing well, Deadmarsh said, breathing on their own and scheduled to go home in about two weeks.

Deadmarsh joked about getting his daughters "into skates here pretty quick," and wondered how many of the kids would grow up together.

Forget years from now. What the heck was going on nine months ago? What kind of water was everybody drinking last spring?

There are studies about how sex affects athletic performance. Coaches in some sports - apparently not hockey - will ban sexual activity before games and events, but that didn't stop Olympic organizers in Sydney from supplying each athlete with an average of 51 condoms. If an athlete can go through 51 condoms in 17 days - that's three a day - well, there should be a medal for that.

Anyway, the Sakic twins were born in October. That puts conception back in January, during a long Avalanche homestand. Foote's son was born in December, so conception was likely in March. Yep, the Avs played just four road games the whole month. On the ice, Foote was plus-10. Off the ice, he became plus-1.

Like Sakic, Foote had just come back from a stint on the injury list. Miller, however, was on the injured list with a bruised sternum when, well, you know. He remembers the fateful day.

"I missed the road trip, otherwise I wouldn't have been home," Miller said.

Guess his sternum didn't hurt that bad.


Avs' Newborns


Grace Heather Miller, born to Aaron Miller in August 2000

Chase and Kamryn Sakic, born to Joe Sakic in October 2000

Chloe de Vries, born to Greg de Vries on Jan. 1

Nolan Foote, born to Adam Foote in December 2000

Madison and Alexis Deadmarsh, born to Adam Deadmarsh on Friday


Article courtesy The Gazette.


The following article was a tie between being placed on the news board and here on this page, but this page won out! Thanks to Rosalyn!

September 16, 2001
Kings' Deadmarsh finds a home
By Matt McHale
Staff Writer for the Los Angeles Daily News

EL SEGUNDO -- For Adam Deadmarsh, the most comforting part about leaving for this year's training camp was knowing home is only five minutes away.
After daily workouts at the Kings' facility, it is just a quick drive to be with his wife, Krista, and twin infant daughters, Alexis and Madison.

Just five months ago, seeing his family meant anxiously flying back to Denver for a few hours on an off day, then joining his new club on the road.

Finally, Deadmarsh has settled in nearby Manhattan Beach, playing with a team he helped get within a game of the Western Conference finals.

Although he admits he cried the day last March when he was traded from Colorado as part of the Rob Blake deal, Deadmarsh was a playoff hero for the Kings and hopes to keep that going.

"The biggest thing I learned last year was really something I already knew, that family was the most important thing," Deadmarsh said Saturday before the Kings played an intrasquad game. "Without them, this really doesn't mean much."

Not only was Deadmarsh traded from a team that eventually went on to win the Stanley Cup, it came just after his daughters were born two months premature. Every time he went out on the road with the Avs last season, he was filled with great uncertainty, first about his wife's difficult pregnancy, then for the health of his newborn children.

"My wife and I had a really tough time, some scary times," Deadmarsh said. "Mostly before the babies were born. Now they're fine and things are really going well."

The experience taught Deadmarsh, 26, not to sweat the small stuff. During the summer, he underwent surgery to remove bone chips from his left wrist. Deadmarsh wore a cast for three weeks and currently is not participating in contact drills.

Just before camp, he flew to Colorado Springs to participate in an orientation camp for the U.S. Olympic hockey team, which will be playing in February in Salt Lake City. Most of the time, he just skated and made sure he didn't aggravate the hand.

He will be ready Oct. 4 when the Kings open the season at home against Phoenix.

Deadmarsh will be needed. Kings coach Andy Murray is looking for someone to fill the scoring void left when Luc Robitaille signed with Detroit.

"We have 37 goals to fill," said Murray, who has Deadmarsh on the first line with Ziggy Palffy and Jozef Stumpel. "Adam can help with that. So can a few other players."

Deadmarsh, who had missed 35 games last year with a variety of injuries, scored a career-high 33 goals during the 1996-97 season. He has averaged 22 during his seven-year career.

After the trade, he had four goals in the final three weeks of the regular season. But it was during the Kings' first-round victory over Detroit that he cemented his season.

He scored the game-winner in Game 5, then came back in Game 6 with his first career playoff overtime goal at the 4:48 mark. The Kings, swept by the Red Wings the year before, were headed to the second round for the first time since 1993.

"Playing his whole career in Colorado, Adam brought playoff experience to the team and a lot of credibility," said Kings goaltender Felix Potvin, another postseason standout. "You could just see how much the guys responded to his style of play. They watched and their confidence grew."

Deadmarsh impressed Murray, not just with his scoring touch, but with the way he took the opponent's top players into the corners. His grit was legendary in Colorado and something the Kings desperately needed to get to the next level.

But during the Detroit series, Deadmarsh found himself staying up late, tuning in to the first-round matchup between the Colorado and Vancouver. He had been with the Avs since they were the Quebec Nordiques. Peter Forsberg is his best friend. League MVP Joe Sakic was more than just a linemate on the power play.

They all had gone out to dinner when the Kings and Avs met in the final weeks of the regular season in L.A., but the playoff meeting was all business.

Potvin posted back-to-back 1-0 shutouts during the series, but Colorado won in seven games.

The Kings had gone on a magical playoff run, but Deadmarsh already had a Stanley Cup ring from 1996. He knew they hadn't gone far enough and certainly didn't get comfort from taking the Avs to the edge of elimination before that team went on to win the Cup again.

"It was hard, I'll be honest," Deadmarsh said. "I didn't enjoy watching after we were knocked out. I didn't watch too much. I have a little bit of a jealous bone, that's for sure. As close as we were, it was difficult knowing we didn't get there. But we regrouped and the one great thing about hockey is there is always next year."

Deadmarsh Becomes a Father Figure for the Kings

The Sporting News May 7, 2001

We could wait to see who wins the Stanley Cup to declare which team was the big winner at the NHL's trading deadline. But two little girls named Madison and Alexis Deadmarsh already have helped convinced me which team deserves that title.

Regardless of how far they go in the playoffs, the Kings clearly made the best deal in acquiring right winger Adam Deadmarsh and defenseman Aaron Miller from Colorado for All-Star defenseman Rob Blake and center Steven Reinprecht.

The Kings already have became kings of the playoff upset. They rallied to beat the Red Wings in the first round and then stole Game 1 from the Avalanche in Round 2. That explains the decision to eliminate all the other candidates.

Candidates such as the Avalanche and Blake; the Blues and left winger Keith Tkachuk; the Devils and defenseman Sean O'Donnell; the Maple Leafs and defenseman Aki Berg; the Sabres and forwards Donald Audette and Steve Heinze; the Penguins and goaltender Johan Hedberg; the Stars and defenseman Grant Ledyard. These deals won't compare to the Kings' acquisition no matter how far the other teams go in the playoffs.

Deadmarsh's twin daughters, Madison and Alexis, still don't understand what happened the night of February 21 when the Kings were six points out of a playoff position and looking for excuses because of Blake's impending free agency and imminent trade. Regular feedings and dry diapers are more important to the youngest members of the Deadmarsh clan than power plays and penalty killing right now.

Madison and Alexis were born six weeks prematurely-only six days before the Avalanche traded their father to Los Angeles. The twins had no vote in their future when their dad said a tearful goodbye to his infant daughters in incubators at the intensive care unit of a Denver hospital. The girls are now 8 pounds each, and they know how special their daddy is to them-and to the Kings.

It's not popular to trade a star like Blake, but in this case the Kings made the right choice because the team was out of the playoffs when the deal was made. Before the deal, the players say, they looked to Blake to get them through every difficult situation. Now that he's gone, the Kings have become self-reliant-and adding Deadmarsh and Miller as leaders has helped show the players they can fend for themselves.

That stick-together attitude, plus reliable goaltending from Felix Potvin, helped the Kings make a great run-13-4-5-2 record after the trade-for the seventh seed in the Western Conferenceand they have put on a good run so far in the playoffs.

"It's been a hard year. But my prayers have been answered," Deadmarsh says. "The babies are both healthy. Everything else is trivial."

Well, almost. Deadmarsh had three goals and two assists in the six games against Detroit, including two game-winning goals. He set up Nelson Emerson to tie Game I against the Avalanche at 2-2.

He carries the smiles of his daughters with him in a photograph in which the girls are wearing the Kings team colors.

"It's tough to take a dad away from his kids any time, never mind under desperate circumstances like this," Kings coach Andy Murray says. "But he hasn't wavered in his dedication to his new team.

"His attitude for the team has been contagious. It's always that extra effort, that extra battle. And I think everyone has learned it takes that extra effort to win in the playoffs."

"The guy goes all-out every second he's out there," left winger Luc Robitaille says. "He and Miller play hurt, they play hard, they play tough. They come from a team expecting to win it all-and they didn't lose that attitude coming to a team that wasn't even guaranteed a playoff spot."

Christa Deadmarsh was sitting in a chair at the hospital holding Madison when she got a call from her mother, who had just heard about the trade.

So much for the fun of sports.

Officials of hockey teams like to talk about how their team is a family experiencing highs and lows together-players, wives and kids. But sometimes these families aren't so kind to each other, such as when a guy who has been with the same team for seven years is traded as Deadmarsh was.

And it's all done in the name of winning a trophy-the Stanley Cup.

"It seems like a long, long road trip for me," Deadmarsh says, "but I've got this picture of my wife and daughters smiling as I left them what seems like months ago. I fall back on that snapshot I feed off of it-every day, every practice, every game."

Deadmarsh knew he was going to come back to Denver one way or another after the Detroit series-either the season would be over, or he would be returning to play. It turned out to be a business trip, but what a homecoming.

After a split in the series, Deadmarsh headed 1,000 miles away from his loved ones again. But he'll be back Friday for another visit with his twins-and another shot at a Stanley Cup.


Senior writer Larry Wigge covers hockey for THE SPORTING NEWS.

Deadmarsh at home in LA
By Matt McHale
Los Angeles Daily News
September 16, 2001


EL SEGUNDO, Calif. - For Adam Deadmarsh, the most comforting part about leaving for this year's training camp was knowing home is only five minutes away.

After daily workouts at the Los Angeles Kings' facility, it is just a quick drive to be with his wife, Krista, and twin infant daughters, Alexis and Madison.

Just five months ago, seeing his family meant anxiously flying back to Denver for a few hours on an off day, then joining his new club on the road.

Finally, Deadmarsh has settled in nearby Manhattan Beach, playing with a team he helped get within a game of the Western Conference finals.

Although he admits he cried the day last March when he was traded from Colorado as part of the Rob Blake deal, Deadmarsh was a playoff hero for the Kings and hopes to keep that going.

"The biggest thing I learned last year was really something I already knew, that family was the most important thing," Deadmarsh said Saturday before the Kings played an intrasquad game. "Without them, this really doesn't mean much."

Not only was Deadmarsh traded from an Avalanche team that eventually went on to win the Stanley Cup, it came just after his daughters were born two months premature. Every time he went out on the road with the Avs last season, he was filled with great uncertainty, first about his wife's difficult pregnancy, then for the health of his newborn children.

"My wife and I had a really tough time, some scary times," Deadmarsh said. "Mostly before the babies were born. Now they're fine and things are really going well."

The experience taught Deadmarsh, 26, not to sweat the small stuff. During the summer, he underwent surgery to remove bone chips from his left wrist. Deadmarsh wore a cast for three weeks and currently is not participating in contact drills.

Just before camp, he flew to Colorado Springs to participate in an orientation camp for the U.S. Olympic hockey team, which will be playing in February in Salt Lake City. He will be ready Oct. 4 when the Kings open the season.



The "Baby Paradise Twins" were adopted by me at: